Video: 2019 Topps Heritage Baseball Card Box Break

Hello COMC Nation!

In 2019 we intend to bring you more video content than ever before. In the coming weeks and months COMC will be making some pretty substantial changes to our Youtube channel. We intend to provide fresh, new trading card related content on a regular basis moving forward. If there is any particular type of video content that you would like to see, please leave us a comment below with your thoughts and ideas!

We kick off our initiative with a baseball card break video featuring 2019 Topps Heritage! Released on February 27th, 2019, Heritage is throwing it back to the classic gray bordered 1970 Topps baseball card design. The 500-card checklist features plenty of big names and rookies, while the product itself boasts plenty of hits including Real One Autographs of superstar caliber players such as Shohei Ohtani and Aaron Judge, and plenty of relic, action image and error variants, and much more.

We’ll have plenty of 2019 Topps Heritage baseball cards in-stock in the coming weeks and months! If you’re looking to finish your set, grab a few short prints or action variations that you weren’t able to pull, or are even in the market for some of the more coveted big hits, we’ll have everything you’re looking for and more!

Shop 2019 Topps Heritage Baseball

Rich Reminisces: The 1967 ‘Impossible Dream’ Boston Red Sox

By Rich Klein
I have been a life-long New York Yankees fan for all but one summer when I just starting to discover baseball. You see myself, like many other baseball fans, were enthralled by the 1967 “Impossible Dream” Boston Red Sox.  As an impressionable very young person whose family had a place in far Northeastern corner of Maine where the sun arrives during the summer at 4:00 AM, the Red Sox were the local team, so how could you not love following them?
I was not aware of the past 15 years of so prior for the Red Sox, but they had barely been competitive since about 1950, and even had to deal with the tragedy of the death of local hero Harry Agganis, who died shortly after turning 26 in 1955. We know when Agannis passed, but there are still some third party authenticated autographed cards of his out there. The card is pretty difficult to find, and the autograph on the card is even scarcer:
But the 1967 Red Sox had a new manager and some new players. Their best player was 27 years old and had just done intense off-season training for the first time.  Those new and improved players, as well as a little luck, turned out to be the key to the Red Sox success.
To begin, 1967 was the summer of Yaz. Carl Yastrzemski would win the triple crown that season and be the last player to lead the league in all three categories until Miguel Cabrera accomplished that feat a few seasons ago. This card pictured was issued a few years ago but gives us the 1967 flavor:
Some of the young players on that team included George Scott and Joe Foy, who had been rookies in 1966. Mike Andrews and Reggie Smith were the rookies in 1967, and a player turning just 22 during the season would finish the season season with over 100 career homers. That player was Tony Conigliaro:
Conigliaro would sadly almost lose the sight in his eye after being struck by a Jack Hamilton fast ball, and never was the same player again. Along with Yaz and Rico Petrocelli, they were the three Red Sox who also played for their 1975 team, which would be the next time the Red Sox won the Pennant.
Anytime I can mention Rico Petrocelli, it helps the hobby. You see, Rico and Tom Zappala host a weekly hobby radio show which feature many leading dealers and hobbyists. Their show can be found here if you’d like to give it a listen:
Rico is a beloved figure in Boston and does many appearances around the area. He has also co-authored many books with the Zappalas, and you can usually see him at the National Sports Collectors Convention each year. I heartily recommend meeting both Tom and Ellen Zappala along with Rico during the National. I promise you will enjoy chatting with them.
The other cool thing was both Mike Andrews and Reggie Smith shared a 1967 Topps rookie card:
One of the oldest known color television broadcasts of a baseball game feature the 1967 Red Sox!  The fact that this is a crucial game in September makes it an even more memorable game. If you have time, I do recommend watching this or having this as background during a game

The 1967 American League pennant race was legendary as four teams actually all lead the league in one confusing September day. As a young fan, I thought every season would be like 1967 season. Well not so much, but if you like to read about a very different time with one team going to the World Series and no one else in the post-season, than 1967 is for you. Just two seasons later there would be the first year of divisional play.
And if you wanted to know if the New York Yankees were doing something that year, they moved the great Elston Howard to Boston, which helped shore up the Red Sox catching situation. Howard solidified the catching position and had his last good season in 1967. I still wish there was a 1969 Topps card of him, but this 1968 serves well:
Oh, and even in the next year these Red Sox would continue to affect baseball history. Jim Lonborg,who had been 22-9 and the 1967 Cy Young award winner, hurt himself in a skiing accident and was never quite the same pitcher again. He was good, but never great. After his accident, many contracts were updated to not let the players do off-season activities which could hurt them. Note the text on his 1968 Topps card:

And lastly, the player mentioned in the quiz is Sparky Lyle, would become a superstar Yankees receiver after being traded for Danny Cater just before the 1972 season. This trade would torment the Red Sox for many years following. Unrelated to Lyle, Cater actually lives in the Dallas-Fort Worth area and his son-in-law and I attend the same Torah (Bible) Study class.  Hey, anytime you can name drop a major league play is worth a shot!

This card is the 1967 Red Sox team card and a scarce high number. Yes, you can use this card to talk about the stories of the famed “Impossible Dream” team. They were called the Impossible Dream because of the then recent popular song from the Man of La Macha musical. This powerful version by Jack Jones was #1 on the Adult Contemporary charts of the time and the best known of the versions.  But everything coalesced in 1967, and I will still not forgive the St. Louis Cardinals, who were a better team, for winning the World Series that year.

Rich Reminisces – The 1959 ‘Go Go’ White Sox

By Rich Klein
I’ve been a life-long Yankees fan, but despite what I like to write, am not enough to actually remember the real glory days of the post -war Yankees dynasty. Between 1947 and 1964 the Yankees won 16 pennants in 18 seasons, which is just astounding. Heck, the only player from the 1947 team who was still active in 1964 was Yogi Berra. Yogi actually missed the 1964 season as he managed the Yankees, but did return for a cameo with the cross-town Mets in 1965. That cameo was for all of nine at-bats before Yogi finally retired.

But just think about that, only three teams won pennants between 1947 and 1966, which is a number that would be surpassed in the 1965-68 time frame. To me, One of those two teams is a perfect case of one team coming, one team going and one team remaining. That team was the 1959 Chicago White Sox, who were known at the time as the “Go Go Sox” because they had the best base stealer in Luis Aparicio, and a bunch of other fast guys playing for them.

Topps got a photo right from the 1959 World Series of Luis Aparicio doing what he did best in those days on his way to a Hall of Fame career.  If you look carefully at the photo you will see Maury Wills awaiting the ball so he can place a tag on Aparicio. That is important because Wills was actually in a long-running feud with Topps, and would not have an official Topps card until the last series in 1967:

The other Hall of Famer on the team was his double play partner Nellie Fox, who would win the 1959 MVP award. Fox was a consistently great player and also deserved his enshrinement into Cooperstown.

There were, of course, other good players on the team, but the real interesting part was that the team was a mix of yesterday’s legends, today’s stars and tomorrow’s heroes

There were ten players on the team who were age 34 or older. While some of them were very important to the team, others were just role players for a cameo appearance. Many of the older pitchers were important to the team, which was led by Early Wynn, who won the 1959 Cy Young award. In those days the Cy Young was only given to one pitcher for the majors and not one per league as has been done since 1967. Other good players for that team in the older brigade included Turk Lown and Gerry Staley, who were a dominant bullpen pair.

But here were some of the players who made cameo appearances for the 1959 White Sox:

Ray Boone, Del Ennis, Don Mueller (he was only 32, but nearing the end of his career) and Hall of Famer Larry Doby. Yes, they were the best players that the White Sox tried and failed to get one last memorable season from.

But the real fun for this team and the players who created the “what might have been” sequence (if Bill Veeck had not realized he needed to win now because his ownership time would be limited) included several players with interesting future stories.

Before the 1960 season even began, Norm Cash would be traded twice, and his 1960 Topps card would depict the Detroit Tigers Cap on the side photo, but a Cleveland Indians cap as the main photo. Cash would win the 1961 Batting title, hitting .361 and stayed in the majors long enough to play in the 1972 post-season.  He is one of only three players who participated in post-season play in the 1950’s, 60’s and 70’s. (The other two were Don McMahon and Willie Mays).

As the White Sox were going for a repeat and loading up on veteran players such as Minnie Minoso and Roy Sievers, the young prospects were being sent away. Among the prospects leaving included Claude Raymond. Not that Raymond was one of the better players who left the White Sox, but he has one of the best card stories as his zipper is undone on both his 1966 and 1967 Topps cards. Thankfully nothing was showing, but how did Topps miss that two straight years?

Other players who left included Joe Stanka, who went to Japan and became a legend there. Our local SABR chapter had breakfast with him about 13 years ago and the stories he told were quite fascinating. He never had a Topps card and all his cards on COMC are currently sold out but I wanted to mention him.

And some of the other future players the White Sox disposed of after 1960 included Earl Battey and Johnny Callison. There were others as wel,l but if all the players the White Sox traded away were allowed to develop, they might have been the backbone of another pennant winner around 1963 or so.

Now I suppose you could say this is true of any team, but if you happened to get all their players to have their best season at the same time you would usually win a pennant. But if you had gotten the 1959 White Sox players to all have their career best seasons that year they might have been a team which won 100 or more games.

After this brief interlude, the Yankees would win their next five pennants and they were smart enough to keep their younger players during that period. I’m showing Jim Bouton as an example because I’ll be talking about him and his famous Ball Four tome in a future article

If Bill Veeck did not feel the need to panic, and let his young players develop, would the White Sox have won more than just that one pennant between 1919 and 2005?

Rich Klein can be reached at RichKlein@Comc.com

Best of 2018: 5 Great “It Sold for WHAT?!?” Cards in COMC History

As we wrap up 2018, we wanted to take the month of December to highlight some of our favorite blog posts of the year. This was one of our most popular new blog series this year, and generated buzz on social media. This story was originally published on 05/21/2018 and is presented in it’s entirety in this blog as well

Over the course of our 11 plus year existence, we’ve seen A LOT of cards. When we say a lot of cards, we mean somewhere in the neighborhood of 52 million and climbing at the time of writing. As you can imagine, we’ve seen our fair share of iconic cards, especially cards that didn’t gain notoriety until many years after we first saw them. This can lend itself to some pretty hilarious historical pricing data when some of these cards sell years or even a decade before they peak in value.

That being said, we’ve scoured some historical sales to find some of the best “It Sold for WHAT?!” examples in COMC’s history:

2009 Bowman Draft Picks & Prospects – Prospects Chrome – Refractor Autograph #BDPP89 – Mike Trout /500

As the legend of Mike Trout continues to grow, so do the value of his 2009 Bowman cards. This particular card was listed for sale on February 19th, 2010 and sold almost two weeks later for a fraction of what it’s worth today. These cards are so desirable that we’ve never seen a copy of this card consigned since. BGS 9 versions of this same card have recently sold for $7000.00.

2000 Playoff Contenders – [Base] Rookie Autograph #144 – Tom Brady [BGS MINT 9]

We have seen our fair share of this coveted Tom Brady rookie card over the years. This BGS 9 version was sold back in June of 2013 for a paltry $1254.00. Recent sales of this card with an equal grade have recently sold in excess of $10,000.

2013-14 Panini Prizm – Autographs – Target Red Prizms #33 – Giannis Antetokounmpo /49 [BGS 9.5 GEM MINT] 

Before earning his nickname ‘The Greek Freak’ and becoming the NBA mega star that he is today, Giannis  Antetokounmpo’s rookie cards could be had for a fraction of what they’re worth now. This beautiful Red Prizm RC autograph sold for just $256 back in October of 2016. A Non-graded version of this card recently sold for over $1,700.

1986-87 Fleer – [Base] #57 – Michael Jordan [BGS 9.5 GEM MINT] 

We’ve seen just two BGS 9.5 graded copies of perhaps the most iconic basketball card ever printed sold on the COMC Marketplace. The most recent took place in 2016 and sold for over $11,000, but it is the first sale that makes this card earn a spot on our list.  In the summer of 2013, a BGS 9.5 Michael Jordan RC was had by a buyer for just over $4,000.00. Talk about a good return-on-investment!

2013 Bowman Draft Picks & Prospects – Draft Picks Chrome – Gold Refractor #BDPP19 – Aaron Judge /50

In hindsight, a 6’7″ power-hitting Yankees prospect flying under the radar just seems silly, but it’s safe to say that Aaron Judge cards sold at pedestrian prices until #AllRise took baseball by storm last year.  Not one, but TWO of these gorgeous gold refractors sold for right around $30 in 2014. This card can’t be had for under $1,000 just four years later.

If you happen to have sold one of these cards, just remember time heals all wounds. It also increased the value of your card exponentially. If you’ve sold a card on COMC that you’ve regretted years later when a player’s stock rose significantly, we want to hear about it! Share your best “What was I thinking?” stories with us!

The Faces Behind COMC #5 – Getting to Know our Processing Team

Welcome back to our ongoing series, “The Faces Behind COMC”. In this series, we highlight the faces and personalities of our hardworking team members who’s day-to-day efforts help ensure that our customers have the satisfactory experience they know and love in using COMC. This time around we’re featuring members of our Processing Team, the team that is responsible tasks such as opening and verifying your consignment submissions, imaging items, and several other duties. These team members see nearly every single card that COMC receives, and work diligently, consistently and efficiently to process your cards.

Chee (Chee21 on COMC)

For over six years now, ‘Mama Chee’ has not only been a key member of our Imaging Team, but she’s been feeding her co-workers with her delicious homemade dishes and treats Her homemade salsa is to die for!  Beloved around the office, Chee is as talented in the kitchen as she is at work, and currently serves as our Imaging Team Lead.  Born in Malaysia, some of her hobbies enjoy watching the wild birds that she feeds at home, trying new receipes, and searching for trading cards at local garage sales. Her best ‘flip’ came recently when she found a Derek Jeter card for $1 and resold it for $70 on COMC. In addition to cards, she enjoys collecting stamps, coins, and recipes

Favorite sport:  Bowling
Favorite players:  Russell Wilson
Favorite Musical Artist(s): Tom Jones
Favorite Movie / TV Show /etc: The Big Bang Theory


Tad 

Tad joined our team in 2014 after looking for a change of pace from his previous career. In that time, he has since become our go-to Lead for specialty imaging.  Born in Seattle, he previously lived in Southern California and has one pet cat named Rico. He collects both baseball cards as well as pint glasses. He prefers the classic rock tunes of bands like Rush, Pink Floyd, among others, who can be heard just about anytime playing in his office.

 

Favorite sport(s): Football & Baseball
Favorite Player: The late Willie Davis (baseball)
Favorite  Food: Pizza
Favorite Musical Artist: Rush
Favorite Movie / TV Show / etc: The Godfather / NFL Redzone
Favorite Card in your Collection: 1969 Topps #65 Willie Davis


Marie

Marie joined the COMC Team in fall of 2011 originally as a member of our Shipping Team, but has since transitioned to our Imaging Team. Born close to COMC Headquarters in Everett, WA, she has previously lived in Bremerton, which is across the Puget Sound from Seattle. Away from COMC, she juggles a part time job with raising her 5-year-old, but says that life is more low-key than it is chaotic. She enjoys arts, crafts and hiking, and collects cute pop culture items.

Favorite Food: Pho
Favorite Musical Artist: Michael Jackson
Favorite Movie / TV Show / etc: Any sci-fi or thriller


Heather (Heather714 on COMC)

You may already be familiar with Heather, as she was featured in our COMC Origins video we published earlier this year. Along with her father Steve, she is one the longest tenured employees at COMC, joining the company over 10 years and several locations ago back in 2007. Born in southern California, she considers herself a Disney nerd, and collects Funko Pops and Bath and Body Works candles in addition to trading cards. She has a pet cat and rabbit, and spends her time doing Zumba, completing puzzles, and volunteering for animal rescue groups when not at work.

Favorite Player: Russell Wilson
Favorite Food: Mac and Cheese
Favorite Musical Artists: Josh Grobam, Girl Generation (K-Pop), Lindsey Stirling

Sets Revisited: 2007 Bowman Draft Picks & Prospects (baseball)

By James Good

Although I consider myself a lifelong collector, there was about a five or six year stretch through my teenage and early adult years where my trading card collection remained largely dormant.  The 2007 Bowman Draft Picks & Prospects set is near and dear to my heart because it was the first product that pulled me back into the hobby as an adult a little over ten years ago. That makes it a perfect candidate for this installment of Sets Revisited.

As close as a 90’s kid would ever get to the real thing!

As a 90’s kid in the hobby, I bought and traded cards not only because it was AWESOME to have a superior collection than my friends, but also because I was led to believe that one day I would be sitting on a goldmine of cardboard. Shout out to all the fellow 90’s collectors with hundreds of pounds of junk wax era cards who felt the same way! While that pipe dream has yet to pan out, 2007 Bowman Draft Picks & Prospect was the first set that really introduced me to the prospecting aspect of the hobby.

In early 2008 I took a job at a sports card and memorabilia shop at the local mall. As I got reacquainted with the hobby, a lot had changed, particularly on the baseball card front. I was completely caught off guard that products containing primarily minor league players had leaped to the forefront of collector’s attention. I could not believe that the Ken Griffey Jr. and 90’s Mickey Mantle insert cards that I loved so much were worth so little, yet collectors were now crazy for kids who had yet to make their major league debut. The idea of a stock market like approach to collecting fascinated me, and I too quickly bought into the hype.

Before I get into the prospecting element of this blog, everyone likes a feel-good story, right? At the time in early 2008, my favorite baseball player on the planet was Tim Lincecum. ‘Lincy’ was a University of Washington pitching standout who I always felt belonged in Seattle Mariners uniform. But as fate would have it, my beloved Mariners instead took Brandon Morrow in the 2006 MLB Draft with the sixth overall pick instead, passing on names like Lincecum, Clayton Kershaw, and Max Scherzer. I’ll save my grievances for a later blog. Regardless, in my very first box of 2007 Bowman DP&P, I pulled a monster rookie card of my favorite player:

2007 Bowman Draft Picks & Prospects – Red Refractor Tim Lincecum #’d 3/5
(It kills me that I don’t have a better picture!)

That was all the excitement and enjoyment that I needed to keep ripping the product for the next several months. To this day, I have not hit a card from a product that I have loved nearly as much as I did that card. One of my biggest regrets in collecting was selling it when money was tight back in 2009. I’m hopeful that someday it will return to my collection, but for now a gold refractor version that I was able to snag for about $30 earlier this year on COMC will suffice.

As far as the prospects in the set, time is the one true constant in the world of professional sports, and time will always tell all. Enough time has passed that there is no more speculation to be had with 2007 Bowman Draft Picks & Prospects. Without further ado…

Who Were We Prospecting Back in 2008?

2007 Bowman DP&P was not a product that was popular for the autographs, but rather for the 1st Bowman non-autographed cards of several top prospects. We’ll get to them later. The set simply did not have a truly standout autograph class at the time:

BDPP111 Daniel Moskos
BDPP112 Ross Detwiler
BDPP113 Tim Alderson
BDPP114 Beau Mills
BDPP115 Devin Mesoraco
BDPP116 Kyle Lotzkar
BDPP117 Blake Beavan
BDPP118 Peter Kozma
BDPP119 Chris Withrow
BDPP120 Corey Lubke
BDPP121 Nick Schmidt
BDPP122 Michael Main
BDPP123 Aaron Poreda
BDPP124 James Simmons
BDPP125 Ben Revere
BDPP126 Joe Savery
BDPP127 Jonathan Gilmore
BDPP128 Todd Frazier
BDPP129 Matt Mangini
BDPP130 Casey Weathers

BDPP131 Nick Noonan
BDPP132 Kellen Kulbacki
BDPP133 Michael Burgess
BDPP134 Nick Hagadone
BDPP135 Clayton Mortensen
BDPP136 Justin Jackson
BDPP137 Ed Easley
BDPP138 Corey Brown
BDPP139 Danny Payne
BDPP140 Travis d’Arnaud

Looking at this list in 2018 is almost painful, and not just because none of the prospects who I invested in panned out. With the success of Tim Lincecum and the (at the time) raw potential of Madison Bumgarner, fellow Giants pitching prospect Tim Alderson seemed like a can’t miss prospect. While the latter two have multiple World Series rings and individual accomplishments, Alderson was never able to reach the bigs, logging nearly 800 minor league innings as of 2016.

I can’t recall if Todd Frazier was a hyped prospect back before his big league debut, but his name is one of two on this list that stand out as having solid big league careers. The other would be Ben Revere, who was one of if not THE top auto to hit in the product. Of the rest of these names, Beau Mills, Michael Main, Jonathan Gilmore, Michael Burgess, Kyle Lotzkar, and Nick Hagadone all had appeal and were considered the best of the rest.

As I spoke to earlier, the real appeal of 2007 Bowman DP&P came from the non-autographed 1st Bowman cards of several top prospects who would command top dollar from the day that the product was released. You can catch the full checklist for all 100 prospects in the set here. So who were the cant miss prospects of this set?

Matt Laporta and David Price were on EVERY prospectors radar. Laporta was generally seen as the safer option of the two, as even prospectors to this day would agree that prized pitching prospects are high-risk, high-reward investment opportunities. Obviously David Price has had a great career up to this point, so it’s always good to see a top prospect who does pan out. Jason Heyward, Madison Bumgarner, and Freddie Freeman were also very coveted prospects who were hot sellers. Freeman  has an opportunity this season to become the first league MVP from this group, although in my belief he’s been passed up in that race as of this writing.

With Jason Heyward, Freddie Freeman, and Johnathan Gilmore, the Atlanta Braves were one of the most coveted teams in the forum group breaking scene. I opted to put my faith and dollars into the San Francisco Giants for the handful of breaks that I took part in.  Aside from Madison Bumgarner’s first prospect chrome and Tim Lincecum’s green-bordered RC, Nick Noonan, Wendell Fairley, and Henry Sosa were all above average prospects at the time as well.

Speaking of above average prospects, here are the five players that I recall being sleeper picks among prospectors. Do you remember any of these guys?

Of these five, I was most invested in Matt Dominguez, who was a machine in Single-A in 2008, cranking out 18 homers. He was never able to hit for both power and average the Major League level though, and it pains me to see that parallels of this chrome card can be had for a fraction of what they were worth back then.

Nobody had a clue about Kluber’s talent 10 years ago!

Lastly, I wanted to mention the one guy who I felt wasn’t on any prospector’s radar back then and who has had arguably the most accomplished career to date. That man would be Corey Kluber and his TWO Cy Young awards!  He remains the only base card in the set that consistently sells for above $5. The entire San Diego Padres team could be had in group breaks for just over double that price back in 2008.

2007 was a really interesting year for this product. The set list is broken up by draft picks, all depicted in professional uniforms, and prospects, who were photographed in action during the World Baseball Classic. Some collectors were put off by the fact that these players were depicted in their WBC country uniform, which really stunted the long term value of Clayton Kershaw’s card in the set among others.

That’s going to do it for this stroll down memory lane. Do you recall any fun memories from this set? Let us know in the comments below!

“It Sold for WHAT?!?” – The Giannis Antetokounmpo Edition

Over the course of our 11 plus year existence, we’ve seen A LOT of cards. In many cases, we first saw a superstar’s cards long before they became a household name. As a result, this lends itself to some pretty hilarious completed sales in our historical sales history. Whether these buyers are cardboard Nostradamus’s, or simply happened to pick up a card before it’s value skyrocketed into oblivion, one thing is for sure: they got a crazy good deal!

In our last installment, we looked at some skewed historical sales history on baseball’s Mike Trout. You can check out that blog here. This time around, we’re featuring ‘The Greek Freak’ Giannis Antetokounmpo. Selected 15th overall in the 2013 NBA Draft, Giannis’ first couple of years in the NBA produced stat lines that were commendable but by no means eye-popping. Coupled with playing for the smaller market Milwaukee Bucks, it wasn’t until the 2015-16 season that his rookie cards begun to take flight.

Then came his breakout season, which saw his cards surge in value and popularity. Not only did Antetokounmpo notch his first All-Star Team selection, but he also won the 2016-17 Most Improved Player award. Playing in 80 games for the Bucks, he accumulated a stat line of 22.9 points, 8.8 rebounds, 5.4 assists, 1.6 steals, and 1.9 blocks per game. He became the first player in NBA history to finish a season in the top 20 in points, assists, rebounds, steals, and blocks. Even though the Bucks fell to the Toronto Raptors in the first round of the Eastern Conference Playoffs, the statement had been made. Giannis Antetokounmpo was a megastar in the making.

He did not disappoint the following season, further cementing himself as the centerpiece of the Milwaukee Bucks franchise. He improved in nearly every statistical category, earning the nod as an Eastern Conference All Star Team starter. By posting his ninth career triple-double in 2017-18, he overtook Kareem Abdul-Jabbar in the history books as the Bucks all-time triple-double leader. Now it’s our turn to look at the history books of COMC and present some of the deals of the past that could have been yours!

2013-14 Panini National Treasures – [Base] #130 Giannis Antetokounmpo

The Panini National Treasures RPA is without question one of the most desired rookie cards in the game. Numbered to just 99 copies, our most recent sale saw the highly coveted card sell for just over $3600 back in February 2017. Two years prior, a savvy COMC user was able to snag one for less than 1/6th of that price! Earlier this month, a BGS 9.0 copy of this card ended at auction for $5300.00!

2013-14 Panini Immaculate Collection – Rookie Patch Autograph #131 – Giannis Antetokounmpo

These are our favorite examples to showcase in the ‘It Sold for What’ blog format because it shows exactly how lucrative rookie card investments can become. Here we see a BGS 9.0 copy achieving an all-time high sale of over $5200 in October 2017. This even better BGS 9.5 Gem Mint version sold back in June 2015 for just over $700.

2013-14 Panini Select – Rookie Jerseys Autographs #1 – Giannis Antetokounmpo 

This is also a fun card for us to showcase because the pricing for different graded copies is all over the place! With raw copies having sold for up to $430, none of the yesteryear sales have remotely come close to that figure. That being said, the buyers of the two Mint 9’s and one Gem Mint 10 were all able to secure their graded copies in 2016 right before the rise of The Greek Freak took form.

2013-14 Panini Crusade – Crusade – Orange Die-Cut #61 – Giannis Antetokounmpo

Crusade inserts have always been a set that is sought after by collectors for it’s beautiful design and wide array of colors of the rainbow. In recent years, Panini has added die-cut versions into the mix, which makes these cards especially difficult to secure a high grade on. This BGS 10 Pristine copy narrowly missed the prestigious black label by just .5 on corners, but it’s former owner narrowly missed hundreds (thousands?) of dollars by selling it in June 2016. With raw copies selling for over $100 just one year later, we’re willing to bet that it will be a long time before another pristine copy hits the market again!

2013-14 Fleer Retro – [Base] – Fleer Metal Precious Metal Gems Red #252 – Giannis Antetokounmpo

Precious Metal Gems are another multi-colored insert set that are widely popular among collectors, with some earlier year sets worth thousands upon thousands of dollars for the right player. Seven lucky individuals were able to get their precious fix by securing one of the 150 red gem Giannis’ printed for less than $20 in 2014. The last completed sale of a PSA 8.5 version was in November 2017 for $236.99, with raw copies selling elsewhere as of late in the $100.00 range.

2013-14 Panini Prizm – Autographs – Target Red Prizms #33 – Giannis Antetokounmpo

We shared this card back in May in our first ‘It Sold For What?’ blog post, but we wanted to bring it back for the Giannis edition! This beautiful Red Prizm RC autograph sold for just $256 back in October of 2016. A Non-graded version of this card sold for over $1,700 earlier this year.

2013-14 Panini Prizm – Red, White, & Blue Wave Prizms #98 – Giannis Antetokounmpo

A word to the wise: BGS 10 Pristine grades are very hard to get, especially on chromium cardstock rookie cards. If you’re ever so lucky as to get one that doesn’t break the bank, hold onto it as long as you can!  This BGS 10 Pristine copy of his 2013-14 Panini Prizm ‘true’ rookie card sold for a paltry $20.87 back in December 2015. Santa delivered one heck of a Christmas present that year, as this card has topped the $300 raw completed sale mark as of November 2017. A PSA 10 copy of this card sold at auction one month ago for $470, but we’re guessing it’s BGS counterpart would sell for a lot more!

Now we want to hear from you! What Giannis Antetokounmpo cards have graced your collection for less than a pretty penny? Share your best investment and #collectfail stories with us!