Retail Therapy – Breaking 2018 Topps Opening Day & Heritage Baseball

With baseball season right around the corner, there is a plethora of 2018 baseball trading card products on the horizon. We wanted to have a little fun prior to the kick off of the season by sharing our recent experience ripping some retail product that we opened from two newly released sets – 2018 Topps Opening Day and 2018 Topps Heritage.

For those unfamiliar with these products, Opening Day is a lower-end product that is often times overlooked in favor of Topps Base Series, which typically releases a few weeks prior to Opening Day. Opening Day includes insert sets geared towards the younger generation of collectors such as Mascot cards, and the whole product itself tends to focus more on the fun aspect of collecting instead of big hits. On the other hand, Heritage is a nostalgia-filled throwback set designed based off Topps sets from 50 years ago. Intentional “error” cards, action image variations, chrome parallels, relic cards and Real One Autographs are just a few of the highlights that collectors look forward to on a yearly basis

Because of the price difference in the products, we decided to open the same dollar amount worth of each product. This meant for Opening Day we would be opening one blaster box ($10), two hanger packs ($3 each), and 3 single packs ($1 each). For Heritage, we would open a hanger box ($10), a hanger pack ($6) and a single pack ($3).

All of our product was purchased at our local Target, which is important to note because Topps Heritage contains retail-exclusive parallels specific to Target and Wal-Mart.



Without further ado, lets get to ripping!

Opening Day was up first and although not typically known to yield huge hits, we were hoping to either beat the odds or at least get a glimpse of one of the first Shohei Ohtani cards in an Angels uniform.

The three single $1 packs did not yield much, with the highlights including an Andrew Benintendi rookie cup card and a Giancarlo Stanton card featuring his new Yankees uniform. That will still take some getting use to seeing!

Our $3 hanger packs yielded slightly (yet not much) better results, as we pulled a trio of New York RC’s – Clint Frazier and Miguel Andujar for the Yankees and Amed Rosario for the Mets. We were also happy to see that our beloved local Seattle Mariners have a card in the “Team Traditions and Celebrations” insert set highlighting Felix Hernandez‘s “King Court” section of Safeco Field!Our $10 blaster box was a fun break, but also not very noteworthy. The lone parallel that was pulled was a blue Corey Dickerson. We also snagged a second year rookie cup card of Cody Bellinger and another trio of New York RC’s, with Frazier and Andujar of the Yankees being flanked by Dominic Smith of the Mets this time around.

Although we didn’t get any major hits (as expected), the break was very enjoyable! The ‘Team Traditions and Celebrations‘ set is a clever and welcome addition to the Opening Day product. As we moved onto our Heritage products with visions of a Red-ink Shohei Ohtani Real One Autograph in our heads, we prepared our eagle eye to spot one of the potentially many short printed error or variation cards found within the product.

These two guys keep following us everywhere! The most notable card out of our $3 pack was a rookie stars combo featuring, you guessed it, Miguel Andujar and Clint Frazier. We’re starting to notice a pattern here…

The $6 hanger pack yielded two more pairs of 2018 rookie stars, with Parker Bridwell of the Angels being the most promising of the four players featured. Giancarlo Stanton is again depicted in a Yankees uniform in the Heritage set, and with such a great pose, something tells us that this will be a base card that will sell in high volume for years to come.

Finally, our $10 hanger box was not bad, but we’ve seen better. Four 2018 rookie stars cards (with Rafael Devers  of the Red Sox rounding out the eight-pack), a Nick Markakis short print, Aaron Judge checklist, second-year Andrew Benintendi Rookie Cup and a  Target exclusive 1969 Collector Card Bryce Harper were the most notable items. Don’t worry, we’ve triple checked that Benintendi – unfortunately it is not one of the short printed 1969 error variations.

Admittedly, neither of the two boxes was particularly memorable. That being said, we want to know which box you think was the better of the two! Leave a comment below letting us know which box you felt is better and also be sure to share your experiences with retail breaks! Have you recently beaten the odds and pulled a monster hit? We want to hear about it!  As always, if you feel so inclined, some of the items in this break can be found in our COMC_Breakhits account. Until next time…Keep on Rippin’!

Let’s Play Ball: 2018 COMC Baseball Pack League Introduction

2018 Topps Opening Day is our set o choice for Pack League!

If it wasn’t apparent already – we are crazy about cards! Our employees come from a wide array of backgrounds in cards and collectibles. Some have joined our team from other roles in the industry, while others were previous hobby shop owners themselves. Nearly all our employees have a story and background with collectibles.

Although various forms of fantasy sports leagues became popularized and more efficiently managed thanks to the advent of the internet, the truth is fantasy sports origins can be traced back to the 1950s. COMC is no stranger to fantasy leagues, as our employees have been eager to pit their sport knowledge against one another in head-to-head fantasy baseball and football leagues over the years.

For the last two years, our employees have developed a clever Pack League concept that sees them not only testing their knowledge of the game, but also their hobby luck as well! For each of the last two football seasons, COMC Office Pack Leagues have been formed. The league predetermines a low-end product that is suitable to be used and each league member purchases a box of the product. Each week, leagues members opens the same number of packs (generally 1-2) and set their weekly lineups using only players found in those packs. The league uses a point based scoring system like weekly fantasy sports, and a winner is determined over the course of the season.

This year, we’re bringing the Pack League concept to Baseball with an 18-week long league using the recently released 2018 Topps Opening Day Baseball. Each week, League Managers will open 2 packs of Opening Day and choose six players (4 hitters, 2 pitchers) within those packs to set their weekly lineup. Trading between Managers will be permitted, but no cards will be carried over from week-to-week.


Players will choose our hitters (2 for per stat category) and two pitchers each week.

Scoring is broken up into three statistical categories:

Batting – Hits (2 cards)
Batting – Home Runs (2 cards)
Pitching – Strike Outs (2 cards)

A single card (player) can only be set to compete in one category. For example, if a Mike Trout card is pulled in a pack, the Manager must decide if they want Trout to compete for hits or for home runs, but not both. If a Manager pulls two Mike Trout cards, they can play one card in each category, or both cards in the same category. At the end of each week, the totals for each team in each category are tallied. The top 3 places in each category earn the following points:

1st – 3 points
2nd – 2 points
3rd – 1 point

(If a tie exists, the tied teams will each take one fewer point for that place and subsequent teams’ places will drop out of the winnings totaling the number of ties.)


  • If 2 teams tie for 1st, they will each take 2 points for that category – no 3rdplace will be awarded and 2nd place will take 1 point
  • If 4 teams tie for 1st, they will each take 2 points for that category – no 2ndor 3rd place will be awarded
  • If 2 teams tie for 2nd, they will each take 1 point for that category – no 3rdplace will be awarded
  • If 4 teams tie for 2nd, they will each take 1 point for that category – no 3rdplace will be awarded
  • If 2 teams tie for 1st and 3 teams tie for 2nd, 1st will each take 2 points for that category and 2nd will each take 1 point for that category – no 3rd place will be awarded

*If any teams tie for 3rd, and no other ties exist in that stat category, each team will still take 1 point for that category

At the end of the COMC Baseball Pack League season, the league Manager who earned the most points throughout the season will reign as the 2018 Pack League Champion. We’ll also be awarding the Home Run King, Hit King, and Strikeout King titles to those Managers who dominated each statistical category.

In our next blog update, we’ll run down the list of competitors in this year’s COMC Baseball Pack League and showcase their week one results!

We hope you’ll enjoy following our Baseball Pack League throughout the 2018 baseball season and maybe even get inspired to get together with some friends and form a league of your own. If you do, be sure to tweet us @checkoutmycards and use #COMCpackleague to tell us about it and other exciting ways you enjoy your cards!

Introducing #CardSTOCK – Evaluating Baseball’s Most Collectible Players!

Welcome to #CardSTOCK , an ongoing series created by Baseball Cards Daily’s Chris Steuber. Having collected and worked in the card industry for over 30 years, Steuber’s insight and knowledge of baseball and the card industry collide in the #CardSTOCK series.  By offering a a detailed analysis of hobby value and ‘Stock’ (i.e. popularity) of upcoming, established, and legendary Major League players, this series aims to help collectors by highlighting players currently trending and on-the-rise in the collecting world.

In the first installment of #CardStock on the COMC Blog, Steuber looks at the six of the game’s most popular and fastest rising superstars.

Cardstock - Mike TroutBrowse Mike Trout Cards

Cardstock - Bryce HarperBrowse Bryce Harper Cards

Cardstock - Aaron JudgeBrowse Aaron Judge Cards

BenintendiBrowse Andrew Benintendi Cards


Behind the Cards: The Fred Hutchinson Story

(Note from COMC: The following post comes to us from the desk of Stan Opdyke, a lifelong fan of the game of baseball who started collecting cards over 60 years ago. He has an affinity for the Baltimore Orioles, his favorite team in his youngest days. Through his involvement in the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Mr. Opdyke was inspired to research and write this brilliant look at the cards produced by the life and times of Fred Hutchinson. If you would like to submit your article to us for consideration to be published on our blog, please email us at


Fred Hutchinson

Fred Hutchinson, at the age of 18, began his professional baseball career in 1938 as a pitcher for his hometown Seattle Rainiers of the Pacific Coast League. Baseball cards were relatively scarce items at the time, at least in comparison to what they would become after World War ll, so unsurprisingly no baseball card of Hutch was produced in his first professional season.

Hutch was sensational for the Rainiers in 1938. Pitching most of the season as an 18 year old, Hutch compiled a 25-7 won/loss record and a 2.48 ERA. On his 19th birthday on August 12, 1938, he pitched before a standing room crowd at Seattle’s Sick’s Stadium in search of his 19th victory. Hutch got the win in a game that stands with the Edgar Martinez double that defeated the Yankees in the 1995 post season as one of the most iconic baseball games ever played in Seattle.

Hutch’s superb season drew the attention of major league teams and one of the two major producers of baseball cards in the 1930’s. On December 12, 1938, the Seattle Rainiers traded Fred Hutchinson to the Detroit Tigers for four players and $50,000 Depression era dollars. The huge outlay of cash undoubtedly influenced the Goudey gum company to include Hutch in its 1939 Premium set. The other major baseball card manufacturer of the era, Play Ball, did not issue a card of Hutch in 1939. 

1939 Fred Hutchinson Goudey Premium

The 1939 Goudey Premiums are listed in the 2013 Standard Catalogue of Vintage Baseball Cards in two distinct series, R303-A and R303-B. The R303-A cards are slightly smaller but otherwise identical to the R303-B cards. Both series of 1939 Goudey Premiums are unnumbered. Hutch appears in the 303-A series. The 1939 Goudey Premiums are baseball cards in that they were issued by a gum company and depict images of baseball players. However, in other ways they are not like baseball cards at all. The smaller sized 303-A cards still measure a very large 4 inches x 6 3/16 inches, far too large to fit in anyone’s shirt pocket. The Goudey Premiums also differ from typical baseball cards because they are printed on paper stock that is about the thickness of a newspaper page. The 1939 Goudey Premiums have the look and feel of a small poster.

The photograph Goudey selected to use of Hutch is a portrait of a teenager sporting a warm grin. It is a rare photo of a smiling Fred Hutchinson. When he grew older, Hutch was given the nicknames “The Bear” and “Old Stoneface,” quite a contrast to the photo on his 1939 Goudey Premium card.

Hutch struggled in 1939.  His trouble began in Spring Training when he lost the ability to throw strikes. His lack of control would have undoubtedly cost him a major league roster spot had the Tigers not invested so much money in him. However, because of the huge cash outlay, Hutch began the 1939 season in the major leagues.

Hutch made his major league debut in one of the most significant games in baseball history. The New York Yankees played against the Tigers in Detroit on May 2, 1939, and for the first time since May 31, 1925, the name of the legendary Lou Gehrig did not appear in a regular season box score. The Yankees scored early and often without Gehrig in the line-up. With the Tigers trailing 13-0, Hutch was brought into the game by Tiger manager Del Baker. Nothing went right for Hutch. Pitching just two-thirds of an inning, he surrendered four hits, five walks and eight earned runs.

Hutch was sent to the minor league Buffalo Bisons of the International League after his disastrous major league debut. His traditional pitching numbers (won/loss and ERA) were better in Buffalo than in Detroit, but in both the major and minor leagues in 1939, his performance significantly lagged the excellent season he had for Seattle in the Pacific Coast League in 1938.

1940 Team Issued Fred Hutchinson Buffalo Bisons card

Hutch’s demotion to the minor leagues led to his second appearance on a baseball card. In 1940 the Buffalo Bisons issued a team set of baseball cards. The 1940 Bisons cards are printed on thicker paper and are much smaller then the 1939 Goudey Premium cards. The unnumbered 1940 Bisons Fred Hutchinson card shows him winding up as if he is about to deliver a pitch. The photograph was obviously staged because the picture was taken on the grass in front of a dugout rather than on a pitcher’s mound.

Hutch pitched for both Buffalo and Detroit in 1940.  Detroit won the American League pennant in 1940 and Hutch was included on the Tigers World Series roster. He pitched one World Series inning against a team he would one day manage, the Cincinnati Reds. He allowed one walk, one hit and one earned run.

In 1941 Hutch, pitching for the Buffalo Bisons, turned in a performance reminiscent of his sensational 1938 season in the Pacific Coast League. He won 26 games for Buffalo in 1941 and in 284 innings he turned in an excellent 2.44 ERA. With such a stellar season behind him, Hutch seemed destined to earn a spot on the Tigers major league roster in 1942. World War II however intervened.

Hutch enlisted in the Navy shortly before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. He served in the Navy’s physical education program. Hutch pitched for Navy teams in Norfolk, VA, Seattle, WA, and Hawaii, so during the war he was able to keep his baseball skills sharp.

The baseball players who served in the military in World War II returned en masse to organized baseball in 1946. Hutch was part of the 1946 waive of ex-servicemen returning to professional baseball.  He spent the entire year in 1946 with the Detroit Tigers. It was the first time he spent a full season in the major leagues.

1991 Reprint of 1947 Tip Top Bread Fred Hutchinson Card

In 1947 Hutch appeared for the first time on a post war baseball card. The Tip Top Baking Company issued several regional baseball card sets in 1947 to promote the sale of Tip Top Bread. The unnumbered cards feature black and white pictures with the player’s name, position, team and league affiliation printed underneath the photo. Hutch’s Tip Top Bread card features a close up portrait of him wearing a Detroit Tigers cap.

In 1948 Hutch did not appear on a baseball card. In 1949 two gum manufacturers, Bowman and Leaf, produced baseball cards of Hutch. Fred Hutchinson’s 1949 Leaf card is his highest priced card. The 1949 Leaf set is extremely difficult to complete. About half the cards in the set are short printed and Hutch’s card is among the short printed cards. His 1949 Leaf card in excellent condition is worth $900.00. By way of comparison two other Hutch cards that are also difficult to find, his 1939 Goudey Premium card and his 1947 Tip Top Bread card, have much lower prices. His Goudey Premium card in excellent condition lists at $75.00 and his 1947 Tip Top Bread card in excellent condition lists at $150.00. (All prices are from the 2013 Standard Catalogue of Vintage Baseball Cards.)

In 1950, Bowman was the only gum company to produce baseball cards. Hutch is included in the 1950 Bowman set. His 1950 Bowman card is derived from a painting that was transformed into a baseball card. The painting depicts Hutch at the very end of his follow through after delivery of a pitch. Bowman got good mileage out of the painting because they used again in 1951. That same year, Hutch was named to the American League All Star team. He pitched three innings in the 1951 mid-summer classic.

In 1952 Hutch made his first appearance on a Topps card. Topps produced its first baseball card set a year earlier, but in its initial set the company did not issue a card of Fred Hutchinson.  Topps made up for its 1951 omission by producing a magnificent card of Hutch in the 1952 set. Bowman again used a painting to create the front of its baseball cards. The artist hired to paint Fred Hutchinson must have noticed the look on Hutch’s face after he had surrendered a long home run.

The Tigers had a miserable year in 1952, almost as miserable as the look on Hutch’s face on his 1952 Bowman card. On July 5th, with the club in last place, Tiger manager Red Rolfe was fired and Hutch was hired to replace him. Hutch remained on the Tigers active playing roster after he took over as manager. He continued in his dual role as a player and a manager in 1953.

Both Topps and Bowman included a card of Hutch in their 1953 sets. Topps took a page from Bowman by using a painting as the template for the front of its 1953 cards. Bowman emulated Topps by issuing a larger baseball card in 1953 than it had produced from 1948 to 1952. (Bowman did not issue a card of Hutch in 1948).  The 1953 Bowman set is considered by most collectors as one of the best baseball card sets ever produced. Hutch’s 1953 Bowman card is representative of the picture quality that exists throughout the set.

Hutch retired as an active player after the 1953 season.  He managed the Tigers for one year after retiring as a player. Neither Topps nor Bowman included managers in their 1954 sets, so 1954 marked the first time since 1948 that Fred Hutchinson did not appear on a baseball card.
After the 1954 season ended Hutch informed the Tigers he wanted a two year contract. The Tigers refused to offer more than one year. The impasse led to Hutch’s departure from Detroit when he refused to sign the one year contact he was offered.

Hutch was out of a job, but he was not out of baseball. In 1955 he returned to his hometown to manage the Seattle Rainiers to a Pacific Coast League pennant.  A year before Hutch”s arrival, the Rainiers began issuing baseball cards to fans who purchased popcorn at the team’s home games. Seattle minor league teams issued popcorn cards every year from 1954 through 1968.  It is hardly surprising that Hutch, the popular hometown manager, was included in the popcorn cards the team produced in 1955.

In 1956 Hutch returned to the major leagues to manage the St Louis Cardinals.  Topps was the only gum company that manufactured baseball cards during the three years Hutch managed the Cardinals.


Topps did not issue a card of Hutch while he managed in St. Louis. Topps  included few cards of managers in the sets it produced from 1956 to 1958. Brooklyn’s Walt Alston and Philadelphia’s Mayo Smith were the only managers Topps included in its 1956 set.  No managers were included in the 1957 set. In 1958 Topps issued only two cards of managers, a card of Reds manager Birdie Tebbetts with two of his players, Frank Robinson and Ed Bailey, and a card on which managers Casey Stengel and Fred Haney appeared together.

Hutch enjoyed some success with the Cardinals. In 1957, St. Louis finished in second place, fueling expectations that the team would contend for the pennant in 1958. However in 1958 the Cardinals played poorly, and as a consequence, Hutch was fired shortly before the 1958 season ended.

In 1959 Hutch returned to Seattle to once again manage the Rainiers. His second stint with the club lasted only three months. He was in town long enough though to appear in the 1959 edition of Seattle Rainiers popcorn cards.

In the middle of the 1959 season, Cincinnati Reds manager Mayo Smith was fired. Hutch was chosen to replace him.  Hutch managed the Cincinnati Reds to a 1961 World Series appearance. As was customary, he served as the National League All Star manager the following year. As a result of managing in the 1962 All Star game, Hutch became one of about a dozen men in baseball history (Hank Bauer, Yogi Berra and Alvin Dark are a few of the others) to manage and play in a World Series and manage and play in an All Star game.

Hutch remained the manager of the Reds until deteriorating health caused him to take a leave of absence in 1964. Hutch appeared in each baseball card set Topps produced from 1960 through 1964.

In late December of 1963 Hutch was diagnosed with cancer. He died of the disease eleven months after he was diagnosed. Between diagnosis and death, Hutch managed the Cincinnati Reds for most of the 1964 season. The determination and courage Hutch displayed during his last baseball season is told by Bruce Markusen in his excellent Hardball Times article, available online, “The Final Year of Fred Hutchinson’s Life.”

Hutch resigned as the manager of the Reds in a letter he sent to team owner Bill DeWitt dated October 11, 1964. Exactly one month later he died in Bradenton, Florida.


2018 Topps Heritage Baseball is Here! Let’s Look at the Inspiration…

By Kin Kinsley

(Note – Please welcome guest blogger Kin Kinsley to the COMC Blog. Kin is a lifelong collector and accomplished writer who currently writes content for his two blogs – I Feel Like a Collector Again and Bean’s Ballcard Blog.)

It’s almost time for one of the most anticipated baseball sets of the season to hit hobby shops and retailers.  The 2018 Topps Heritage set is scheduled for a February 28th release.  This year’s set design mimics the popular 1969 set, so let’s take a look at the set kids were collecting in the summer of ’69.

Cream of the Crop: The Three Top Cards of 1969 Topps

1969 Topps #533 Nolan Ryan
Combining the career leader in strikeouts and a higher series release makes Nolan Ryan one of the most desired in the set. Even for the poorest condition of cards, you should expect to pay at least $30…if you’re lucky.

1969 Topps #260 Reggie Jackson
The card of “Mr. October” Reggie Jackson is the top rookie in the set. Best known for wearing glasses and as a Yankee, the image of a young Jackson sporting an Athletics vest provides a very different look. Picking up anything other than a poor condition cards will likely set you back more than $40.

1969 Topps #500 Mickey Mantle
Mickey Mantle’s sunset card may be the most popular card in the set because, well, Mickey Mantle. The card is in one of the most common series, but more cards haven’t hampered the price or collectability.

Who’s the New Guy?: Three Featured Rookie Cards of 1969 Topps

Reggie Jackson’s rookie card is the most well-known in the set.  However, there are some other quality rookies in the set:

1969 Topps #597 Bobby Floyd/Larry Burchart/Rollie Fingers
Rollie Fingers is the “other” Oakland Athletics rookie in the set that has been enshrined in the Baseball Hall of Fame.  In 1992, he was just the second reliever elected.  Twelve years after this card was released (1981) he won BOTH the American League MVP and Cy Young Awards.  You should be able to get lower condition copies of the card for $20 or less.

1969 Topps #630 Bobby Bonds
I’m sure that to many Bobby Bonds is best known as Barry’s dad.  The elder Bonds accomplished many of baseball’s “first” and held all-time records at the time of his retirement.  He was the first player to have two 30/30 seasons and ended his career accomplishing this a record five times (later matched by Barry).  He also held the career and season records for times leading off a game with a home run, but both records have been broken.

1969 Topps #516 Earl Weaver
Who’s to say that a manager’s rookie card can’t be desirable?  It can if it’s Earl Weaver.  The best example I can give of why is the sheer number of post-career sets that Weaver appears in.  They are all as a manager, as he never made it to the bigs as a player.  He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1996 and you can easily find a copy of his rookie card for less than $10.

Shenanigans and Mishaps: Three errors and variations from 1969 Topps

1969 Topps #653 Aurelio Rodriguez
It’s not an error or variation, but the Aurelio Rodriguez is one of the better known cards in the hobby.  Why?  He’s not pictured on the card but instead, it’s an Angels batboy. The switcheroo wasn’t known for a few years so the error was never corrected.  You can easily find this card for less than a couple bucks.

1969 Topps #500 Mickey Mantle (VARIATION)
There aren’t many variations in the 1969 Topps set so I’m sure Mickey Mantle being one of them is pure happenstance.  Instead of Mantle’s last name appearing in yellow, it’s white on the variation.  If you want to acquire this one, be prepared to shell out some good money.

1969 Topps #47 Paul Popovich
The Paul Popovich variations are my favorites in the set for a couple of reasons.  Popovich attended West Virginia University (my alma mater), making it a favorite for that reason alone.  Also, it’s the only card in the set with three variations.  There are two airbrushed versions (thick and light) that the Cub “C” is not visible on.  There’s also a version where you can still see the “C” despite the airbrushing (pictured above).  The version with the “C” showing can command a premium, but nothing too significant.  I find it interesting and reflective of the innocent days passed in trading card collecting.

Best of the Rest: Three “Cooler” Cards From 1969 Topps

1969 Topps #650 Ted Williams
Let’s face it, not everyone that would like a Ted Williams card from his playing days can afford one.  I’ve been collecting for more than 30 years and have never really looked because the prices are out of my comfort zone.  However, most anyone should be able to lay down $10 or so to pick up a copy of this card.

1969 Topps #100 Hank Aaron
I feel that Hank Aaron was pretty decent with the lumber himself.  People think of him as a power hitter but either forget or don’t know that he also hit .305 during his career.  You can usually find low grade copies of the long time home run king for under $10.

1969 Topps #237 Bobby Cox
There are more than a handful of things iconic about the Topps brand.  One of them is the All-Star Rookie Trophy on the front of cards.  Bobby Cox didn’t make the Hall of Fame for his playing career, but he was one of the All-Star Rookies.  This is his only mainstream card from his playing days and you can find copies for around $10.

One of the best things about our hobby is the multitude of ways to acquire and collect. I always encourage that collectors get out there and support your local card shop, but if that is not an option, Topps Heritage should be available today at most retail locations on February 28th. For those collectors uninterested in the pack rippin’ experience, 2018 Topps Heritage should be appearing on the COMC marketplace in just a few weeks. Regardless of how you choose to collect, enjoying the experience is the most important aspect. Happy Collecting!

COMC at the National Sports Collectors Convention July 26th-30th

Hello COMC Nation!

The 38th Annual National Sports Collectors Convention in Chicago, IL is just three weeks away, and we can’t wait to see you there! The convention will be held at the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center from Wednesday, July 26 – Sunday, July 30. COMC representatives will be on hand at Corporate Pavilion Booth 646 to take consignment submissions and chat about COMC and all things card related. We also have some fun giveaways and social media events planned, so be sure to swing by and say hello.


Spin to Win

The Spin is In! Come by the booth during any day of the show and sign in to your COMC account to spin the wheel for your chance to win COMC store credit or one of several grand prize cards. Don’t have a COMC account yet? No problem! We’ll have computers set up at the show where you can sign up for your free COMC account and get your entry to spin the wheel.

Every spin is guaranteed to win a prize, and you’ll also earn an exclusive bonus gift to take with you, just for spinning! One spin per person during the show, and you don’t need to be present to win. Cards and store credit prizes will be issued to your COMC account after the show, so be on the lookout for a nice little bonus to your COMC account when you get home.

Consignment Submission Drop Off

Here at COMC, we’re all about doing the work so you can enjoy the hobby and we’ll be at the show to take it a step further. Don’t even bother shipping your COMC submissions, we got you covered. Whether you’re bringing your cards from home or you find some gems at the show you want to flip, we’ll cover the postage for all consignment submissions you drop off with us at the show.

To speed up the process, please pack your items securely for shipment and print your submission paperwork in advance. We’ll still have computers and a printer there if you find cards at the show and need to create another submission.

New Current-Year Processing

We just introduced a couple exciting new options to help you list your current-year cards faster. Current-Year Basic guarantees your cards list within 1 month for only $0.30/card, and Current-Year

Select guarantees 1 week for only $0.60/card! The National is a perfect opportunity to grab some of the hobby’s latest releases and try out a couple of our newest processing services.

Time with Tim

COMC Founder and CEO Tim Getsch looks forward to the National every year so he can to meet face to face with many of the thousands of COMC users and hear their feedback, ideas, and the experiences they’ve had with our services.

If you’d like to take some time to sit down with Tim for 30 minutes at the show, email us at and we’ll get you scheduled. In your email, include your dates and times of availability as well as any topics you wish to discuss. Please send your meeting request no later than Thursday, July 20.

Due Dates during The National

Many of us will be representing COMC at the booth this year, but this time around we also wanted to encourage some other employees to attend the National. Because we will be short-staffed back at the office, all Select and Premium due dates that normally would have fallen between July 26 and July 30 will receive a July 31 due date.

The National is one of the most exciting events in trading cards, and we anticipate this year’s will be the best one yet. See you there!

Happy Collecting!

– The COMC Team

“Who is COMC?” – An Inside Look at the Faces Behind COMC

Hello COMC Nation!

We have a very special video to share with you! In this look inside the halls of COMC, members of our team talk about what it’s like working at COMC, the culture of our office and our values as a company. Please enjoy and let us know what you think!